John Patton : Along came John

John Patton : Along came John

45.00

John Patton (organ), Fred Jackson, Harold Vick (tenor sax), Grant Green (guitar), Ben Dixon (drums)

Blue Note 4130

Analogue Productions Records : 2 LPs 180 gram (45rpm)

Limited edition : 2,500 printings

Brand New and Sealed Record

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1 - The Silver Meter
2 - I'll Never Be Free
3 - Spiffy Diffy
4 - Along Came John
5 - Gee Gee
6 - Pig Foots

Recorded on April 5, 1963 at Rudy Van Gelder Studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

John Patton, Grant Green and Ben Dixon were introduced to Blue Note by Lou Donaldson and quickly became the quintessential rhythm section for Blue Note's funkier session. They came together for Along Came John, John Patton's first album, with two of the label's tenor saxophonists Fred Jackson and Harold Vick. The double tenors and organ trio make an unbeatable combination for some soulful, swinging music. The title tune and "The Silver Meter" were radio hits that remain among the most popular of Patton's recorded performances.

If you like Booker T and MG's, you'll love Big John Patton's Along Came John. It is, without a doubt, the funkiest, bluesiest, most soulful organ jazz record of all time, bar none. And that includes everything ever done by the legendary Jimmy Smith. Along Came John is a great party record, and once you hear it, you'll be moving your feet and feeling the groove. 

This is blues, pure and simple—and I do mean simple. There are six songs and every one of them uses the same three-chord template. Yep, it's a formula, but it works. Like lots of great rock records—think "Louie Louie" or almost anything by Chuck Berry—there are infinite variations on the three-chord blues. Along Came John features three hot and lively blues, two fun mid-tempo blues and one slow and mournful blues. All come with crazy catchy hooks. 

The band is equally simple : Patton on organ, Grant Green on guitar, Ben Dixon Quintet on drums and two tenor saxophones—Fred Jackson and Harold Vick. (I can't tell them apart, and there's no need to. Both are wailing wonders).

Let's put this in perspective. Along Came John was recorded in April 1963. Just five months earlier, Booker T and the MGs released "Green Onions," one of the greatest and most popular R&B instrumental hits ever. It featured a ridiculously catchy hook, yet another variation on a three-chord blues, by one of the all-time great organ-guitar combos. Along Came John is the musical child of "Green Onions," plus horns. There's nothing complex or sophisticated here. No amazing techniques or unusual rhythms. If cerebral jazz is your thing, look elsewhere. But if you like your jazz fun and funky, get this record. It's a classic of the genre.

The "golden age" of recordings was from 1955 to 1965, at the beginning of the LP and the stereo era, where pure vacuum tube amplification helped produce recordings demonstrating unparalleled fidelity and warmth, lifelike presence and illumination.

This Analogue Productions LP was remastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray at AcousTech, using pure analogue components only, from the original analogue studio tapes through to the cutting head and was pressed on virgin vinyl at RTI.

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