Ike Quebec : It might as well be Spring

Ike Quebec : It might as well be Spring

65.00

Ike Quebec (tenor sax), Freddie Roach (organ), Milt Hinton (bass), Al Harewood (drums)

Blue Note 4105

Analogue Productions Records : 2 LPs 180 gram (45rpm)

Limited edition : 2,500 printings

Brand New and Sealed Record

Discontinued : last copy available!...

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1 - It Might As Well Be Spring
2 - A Light Reprieve
3 - Easy - Don't Hurt
4 - Lover Man
5 - Ol' Man River
6 - Willow Weep for Me

Recorded on December 9, 1961 at Rudy Van Gelder Studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

Working with the same quartet that cut Heavy Soul - organist Freddie Roach, bassist Milt Hinton and drummer Al Harewood - Ike Quebec recorded another winning hard bop album with It Might As Well Be Spring. In many ways, the record is a companion piece to Heavy Soul. Since the two albums were recorded so close together, it's not surprising that there a number of stylistic similarities, but there are subtle differences to savor. The main distinction between the two dates is that It Might As Well Be Spring is a relaxed, romantic date comprised of standards. It provides Quebec with ample opportunity to showcase his rich, lyrical ballad style, and he shines throughout the album. Similarly, Roach has a tasteful, understated technique, whether he's soloing or providing support for Quebec. The pair have a terrific, sympathetic interplay that makes It Might As Well Be Spring a joyous listen.

The "golden age" of recordings was from 1955 to 1965, at the beginning of the LP and the stereo era, where pure vacuum tube amplification helped produce recordings demonstrating unparalleled fidelity and warmth, lifelike presence and illumination.

This Analogue Productions LP was remastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray at AcousTech, using pure analogue components only, from the original analogue studio tapes through to the cutting head and was pressed on virgin vinyl at RTI.

 

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