Charles Mingus : Let my Children Hear Music

Charles Mingus : Let my Children Hear Music

18.50

Teo Macero (alto sax, conductor), Charles McPherson (alto sax), Bobby Jones (tenor sax), Hal McKusick, James Moody, Jerry Dodgion (reeds), Lonnie Hillyer, Jimmy Nottingham, Joe Wilder, Snooky Young (trumpet), Julius Watkins (french horn), Jimmy Knepper (trombone), Roland Hanna, Jaki Byard, John Foster (piano), Charles McCracken (cello), Charles Mingus, Ron Carter, Richard Davis, Milt Hinton (bass), Dannie Richmond (drums) 

Recorded in 1971

Columbia 31039

Pure Pleasure Records : LP 180 gram

Brand New and Sealed Record

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1. The Shoes of the Fisherman's Wife Are Some Jive Ass Slippers
2. Adagio Ma Non Troppo
3. Don't Be Afraid, The Clown's Afraid Too
4. Hobo Ho
5. The Chill of Death
6. The I of Hurricane Sue

Recorded September 23 & 30, October 1st, and November 18, 1971.

Let My Children Hear Music's music is scored for large jazz orchestra and Charles Mingus worked with several arrangers, orchestrators and conductors, most notably Sy Johnson and Alan Raph, to realize some of his most ambitious compositions.

The album was nominated for the 1973 Grammy Award for Best Album Notes (Non-Classical).

On the original LP issued by Columbia, Mingus thanked producer Teo Macero for "his untiring efforts in producing the best album I have ever made." From his deathbed in Mexico in 1979 he sent a message to Sy Johnson (who was responsible for many of the arrangements on the album), saying that Let My Children Hear Music was the record he liked most from his career. Although Mingus' small-group recordings are the ones most often cited as his premier works, this album does, in fact, rank at the top of his oeuvre and compares favorably with the finest large-ensemble jazz recordings by anyone, including Ellington. The pieces had been brewing over the years, one from as far back as 1939, and had been given more or less threadbare performances on occasion, but this was his first chance to record them with a sizable, well-rehearsed orchestra. Still, there were difficulties, both in the recording and afterward. The exact personnel is sketchy, largely due to contractual issues, several arrangers were imported to paste things together, making the true authorship of some passages questionable, and Macero (as he did with various Miles Davis projects) edited freely and sometimes noticeably. The listener will happily put aside all quibbles, however, when the music is heard. From the opening, irresistible swing of "The Shoes of the Fisherman's Wife Are Some Jiveass Slippers" to the swirling depths of "The I of Hurricane Sue," these songs are some of the most glorious, imaginative, and full of life ever recorded. Each piece has its own strengths, but special mention should be made of two. "Adagio Ma Non Troppo" is based entirely on a piano improvisation played by Mingus in 1964 and issued on Mingus Plays Piano. Its logical structure, playful nature, and crystalline moments of beauty would be astounding in a polished composition; the fact that it was originally improvised is almost unbelievable. "Hobo Ho," a holy-roller powerhouse featuring the impassioned tenor of James Moody, reaches an incredible fever pitch, the backing horns volleying riff after riff at the soloists, the entire composition teetering right on the edge of total chaos. Let My Children Hear Music is a towering achievement and a must for any serious jazz fan. Included is the essay that accompanied the album. That essay, covering enormous territory, reads like an inspired Mingus bass solo and should be sought out by interested listeners. One can't recommend this album highly enough.