Milt Jackson : Plenty, Plenty Soul

Milt Jackson : Plenty, Plenty Soul

29.00

Milt Jackson (vibraphone), Cannonball Adderley (alto sax), Sahib Shihab (baritone sax), Frank Foster, Lucky Thompson (tenor sax), Joe Newman (trumpet), Jimmy Cleveland (trombone), Horace Silver (piano), Percy Heath, Oscar Pettiford (bass), Art Blakey, Connie Kay (drums)

Atlantic 1269

ORGM Records : LP 180 gram

Brand New and Sealed Record

Quantity:
Add To Cart

A1 - Plenty, Plenty Soul
A2 - Boogity Boogity
A3 - Heartstrings
B1 - Sermonette
B2 - The Spirit-Feel
B3 - Ignunt Oil
B4 - lues At Twilight

Recorded on January 5 and 7, 1957.

Milton "Milt" Jackson was an American jazz vibraphonist, usually thought of as a bebop player, although he performed in several jazz idioms. A very expressive player, Jackson differentiated himself from other vibraphonists in his attention to variations on harmonics and rhythm. He was particularly fond of the 12-bar blues at slow tempos. He preferred to set the vibraphone's oscillator to a low 3.3 revolutions per second (as opposed to Lionel Hampton's speed of 10 revolutions per second) for a more subtle vibrato.

"...Two sessions led by vibraphonist Milt Jackson... Bags is in fine form (and contributed four of the seven selections)... The first side of Plenty, Plenty Soul, which features a nine-piece group, is highlighted by the contributions of the exuberant altoist Cannonball Adderley, while the flip side has a sextet that is not hurt by the solos of tenor-saxophonist Lucky Thompson. With pianist Horace Silver helping out on both sessions, these all-star dates still sound fresh and enthusiastic decades later." - Scott Yanow, allmusic.com

The "golden age" of recordings was from 1955 to 1965, at the beginning of the LP and the stereo era, where pure vacuum tube amplification helped produce recordings demonstrating unparalleled fidelity and warmth, lifelike presence and illumination.

This ORG Music LP was remastered by Bernie Grundman, using pure analogue components only, from the original analogue studio tapes through to the cutting head and was pressed on virgin vinyl at Pallas.