Herbie Hancock : Empyreann Isles

Herbie Hancock : Empyreann Isles

85.00

Herbie Hancock (piano), Freddie Hubbard (trumpet), Ron Carter (bass), Antony Williams (drums)

Blue Note 4175

Music Matters Records : 2 LPs 180 gram (45rpm)

Limited Edition : 2,500 printings

Brand New and Sealed Record

Discontinued : last copy available!...

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A - One Finger Snap
B - Oliloqui Valley
C - Cantaloupe Island
D - The Egg

Recorded on June 17, 1964, at Rudy Van Gelder Studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

Empyrean Isles is the fourth album by Herbie Hancock. It features the debut of two of his most popular compositions, "One Finger Snap" and "Cantaloupe Island". 

Throughout his career, Herbie Hancock has always pushed the boundaries, exploring a wide variety of music while bringing his flair to every setting. His Blue Note albums of the 1960's ranged from post bop to Latin jazz (he penned "Watermelon Man"), straight ahead to free form. Empyrean Isles, recorded when Hancock was 24 and a new member of the Miles Davis Quintet, features the pianist pushing at the boundaries of hard bop, creating fresh, new music. In a quartet with Freddie Hubbard, Ron Carter and Tony Williams, Hancock shows that he was familiar with both avant-garde jazz and groovin' R&B. His four compositions include the original and most exciting version of "Cantaloupe Island" and the swingingly unpredictable "One Finger Snap." Empyrean Isles brims with the power and adventure of the best 1960s Jazz, pushing ahead into uncharted territory. 

In the original liner note, Duke Pearson writes : "This is a quartet album for trumpet and rhythm section. In this circumstance, a problem was created for the composer-arranger, in that the lack of another instrument supporting the lower, richer register, such as a tenor saxophone, might result in a shallow sound. With this problem in mind, Herbie Hancock, who composed and arranged all the tunes, wrote them sound more like improvisation than ensemble melodies, so that the warmth and fullness of a supporting melody would not be missed. Free sketches were written in such a way that each instrument is allowed great flexibility of interpretation. In many cases, no melodic line was led out over the chords nor atonal clusters written, so that the trumpeter could supply any melody he wished."

The "golden age" of recordings was from 1955 to 1965, at the beginning of the LP and the stereo era, where pure vacuum tube amplification helped produce recordings demonstrating unparalleled fidelity and warmth, lifelike presence and illumination.

Like all Music Matters Jazz releases, this audiophile vinyl reissue is remastered from the original analogue Van Gelder studio tapes and pressed on 180g virgin vinyl at RTI in Camarillo, CA. The highest quality gatefold cover features original session photography on the inside.

 

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