Mischa Elman : Recital

Mischa Elman : Recital

27.00

Mischa Elman (violin), Joseph Seiger (piano)

Decca LXT 5303

Analogphonic Records : LP 180 gram

Brand New and Sealed Record

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Giovanni Battista Sammartini (1698-1775) (arr. Nachez) :
A1 - Passacaglia
Tommaso Antonio Vitali (arr. Charlier) :
A2 - Ciaccona
George Frideric Handel (1685-1759) :
B1 - Sonata No. 4 in D Major, Op. 1, No. 13
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) :
B2 - Air On the G String - from Suite No. 3 in D Major

Recording details unknown.

Mischa Elman (1891-1967), who was born at Talnoy, Kiev, made his first public appearance as a violinist at a village concert when he was five years old. His prodigious talents soon came to the notice of Leopold Auer, who adopted him as a pupil at St. Petersburg in 1901. Elman's Berlin debut took place in 1904, with immediate and outstanding success, which was repeated in the following year on his first appearance in London when he played the Tchaikovsky concerto at the Queen's Hall. With this same concerto, three years later, he introduced himself to America (New York, December 1908). Since then he has been recognized as one of the world's foremost violinists, and is particularly renowned for his beautiful tone and technical mastery. In the present recording, Mischa Elman presents some of the shorter pieces with which he has captivated audiences all over the world.

"Elman still plays with charm and elegance... In this batch of pieces, where the encore wags the concert, so to speak, Elman and Seiger combine war-horses and novelties in captivating manner. I was charmed by the exotic From San Domingo, by Arthur Benjamin, with its echoes of guitars and popular songs. Charles Miller’s Cubanaise... (its) vivacious rhythms and sonorous middle section are most appealing. Perhaps the item that most listeners will fall for is Elman’s arrangement of the so-called Canto Amoroso by Sammartini, an encore which Elman has made peculiarly his own." - Gramophone

The "golden age" of recordings was from 1955 to 1965, at the beginning of the LP and the stereo era, where pure vacuum tube amplification helped produce recordings demonstrating unparalleled fidelity and warmth, lifelike presence and illumination.

This Analogphonic record was mastered from the original Deutsche Grammophon master tapes by Marteen De Boer, using pure analogue audiophile equipment, cut at Emil Berliner Studio Berlin, and pressed at Pallas GmbH in Germany.