Debussy : La Mer

Debussy : La Mer

29.00

Charles Munch conducting the Boston Symphony Orchestra (1956)

RCA "Living Stereo" LSC 2111

Analogue Productions - Quality Records : LP 200 gram

Brand New and Sealed Record

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Claude Debussy (1862-1918) :
La Mer (The Sea)
Jacques Ibert (1890 - 1962) :
Ports of Call (Escales)

Claude Debussy's rich and evocative depiction of the underwater realm remains an impressionistic milestone, a classic of its type. But what makes La Mer so good? Ever-resistant to the confines of normal practice, impressionist composer Claude Debussy insisted that his La Mer was not a symphony. No, even though it contains three symphonic movements that could quite happily be classified as a symphony. Debussy preferred to call it a set of 'symphonic sketches' - something of a milestone in itself. La Mer (literally 'The Sea') was a confusing prospect to audiences of 1905, as it was neither a normal symphony nor a complete departure. Parisian audiences initially didn't really warm to it either, perhaps partly because of the scandal of Debussy having left his wife for the singer Emma Barduc. Debussy took inspiration not from the rolling waves of the Pacific or the Atlantic, but from the rather more unlikely locale of Eastbourne on the south coast of England. He finished composing the work's three movements there in 1905, saying that he found more inspiration in paintings of the sea than being near the sea itself.

The "golden age" of recordings was from 1955 to 1965, at the beginning of the LP and the stereo era, where pure vacuum tube amplification helped produce recordings demonstrating unparalleled fidelity and warmth, lifelike presence and illumination.

This Analogue Productions LP was remastered by Ryan Smith at Sterling Sound, using pure analogue components only, from the original analogue studio tapes through to the cutting head and was pressed on 200-gram virgin vinyl at Quality Record Pressings.